Texas


South Padre Sign

Can you give me a clue to step two? Jump?  Head between knees?   Fire!?


What’s it Mean?

This flag on South Padre Island, Texas kept me puzzling for some time. I came up with several ideas, none of which were correct. Thanks to the Historical Flags of Our Ancestors website for providing an explanation: “Thin Blue Line Flag…a testament to the valor of police officers across the country. The courage exhibited by officers in the line of duty is represented by the Thin Blue Line in the center of the flag. The solemn black background acts as a memorial to the lives lost while shielding citizens from danger.” I’m glad I asked.


Galveston’s Rescued Tall Ship

Standing on deck, soaking in the masts, rigging, and other nautical necessities* was extra thrilling after seeing Elissa’s history video.  Built in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1877, she sailed the seas for 90 years and was bound for a scrap yard in Greece when the Galveston Historical Foundation bought her.  It took 4 years just to strengthen her enough to survive the tow ‘home.’  Had the Foundation known how many volunteers, historical craftsmen, and donations her makeover would take, she’d have probably stayed scrap.  Little wonder that Elissa is one of the world’s oldest sailing hulls still in operation. Galveston has to be proud of her as well as their fortitude in seeing the […]


Forth Worth Five

The problem with being a slippery sort is that it’s so easy to slip up.  Kid Curry–the most wanted outlaw of his time and cohort of Butch and Sundance–probably changed his alias more often than his underwear.  He and those he ran with were so careful to ride under the radar that even when they made the mistake of having their picture* taken, lawmen spent years looking for someone who could identify them. It was the (already widowed) bride from the wedding the fellas dressed up for who finally came across with their aliases. Even she didn’t know their actual names. I learned […]


Cement Sinker? 2

Concrete seemed not to be the best choice for shipbuilding. Who would have thought? The U.S. government tried using it during World War I because steel was in short supply. One of those ships, the SS Selma wasn’t completed until the war was over, so she was used as an  oil tanker for 11 months.  It wasn’t her fault that a reckless steersman put a hole in her, or that no one knew how to fix it.  She’s still toughing it out in the shallows off Galveston almost 100 years after she was abandoned there. As a shipwreck she’s a grabber. I wish I […]